Author Topic: WATER  (Read 1905 times)

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Cape Cod 13

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WATER
« on: March 31, 2009, 06:01:30 PM »
I have never seen the water come up like that and I have been watching for years. Does anyone know what it is? Cape Cod 13

frank m

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Re: WATER
« Reply #1 on: March 31, 2009, 11:10:55 PM »
Not sure what that is. I have seen It before though.  By the way, that first boat is the 'Ocean Tower'

Frank

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Re: WATER
« Reply #1 on: March 31, 2009, 11:10:55 PM »

Cape Cod 13

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Re: WATER
« Reply #2 on: June 10, 2009, 03:30:29 PM »
I had to ask about the water I see once in awhile coming out of the poles. Maybe you know what it was for but I didn't so I asked. The answer was (I believe this was a fire drill.  They do this in case there is a fire on a vessel, our water systems can help put it out.)  C.C.13

BillB48

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Re: WATER
« Reply #3 on: September 17, 2009, 02:14:07 PM »
What you see in the first picture is a "slopover."  Might be a little hard to describe but I'll try.  Each lane, (East or West) has only one dedicated culvert feeding the water to or from the chamber.  The dedicated culvert is located in each of the side walls.  The center wall has a culvert than can be shared be either the east or west lanes.  In general the center wall culvert is either open or closed to a lane.  The opening or closing of the center culvert is accomplished by a set of clyndrical valves.  There are 10 valves for each level of each lane, making a total of 40 valves at Miraflores.  These valves a swapped back and forth several times during a lockage to try and give each ship the most use of dual culverts during a lockage.  Roughly 8 minutes fill/spill using 2 culverts as opposed to 15 minutes using only the sidewall culvert.  Lost anyone yet?

In the first picture you see the far chamber, (upper level west) with low water.  The near chamber, (upper level east) high water.  The cylyndrical valves for the upper level west are being closed.  After they are all ten closed, two of the valves on the upper level east must be "cracked."  This cracking is only about a 3 second operation.  When the valves are opened to low chamber,air is addmitted to the top of the center wall culvert.  This air is purged by the cracking of the two valves, allowing water to slowly come into the culvert.  After about 20 seconds the rest of the valves can be opened to the "high" side and the culvert then be used by the other lane.  If this procedure is not  follow very closely, the burping of water you saw can happen.  There is another way the slopover can occur, but that is even more drawn out than this explanation.

The other pic with water jets is just fire surpression and they are not connected with each other.

Cape Cod 13

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Re: WATER
« Reply #4 on: September 18, 2009, 07:57:34 AM »
Thank you so much, that helps a lot. Good answer, and easy to read. C.C.13  :thanx:  :wave:

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Re: WATER
« Reply #4 on: September 18, 2009, 07:57:34 AM »